GreenStar Partners with Ithaca Children’s Garden

Friday, 28 February 2014 16:07

By Joe Romano, 

Marketing Manager

childrensgardenHow do Ithacans grow smart, strong, and healthy kids? With the Ithaca Children's Garden, of course! That is why GreenStar has partnered with ICG in a wide assortment of ongoing initiatives over the next four years. We have chosen ICG as a partner because of their history of teaching kids about the environment and their ongoing commitment to teaching kids about growing and eating healthy, sustainable food. "Everything we do at the Ithaca Children's Garden is done with one goal in mind: To inspire the next generation of environmental stewards," they say on their website. "We know the best way to do that is to get more children outside, with hands-on experiences, having fun in the natural world."

This is clearly aligned with GreenStar's Vision Statement in which "We envision a world that reveres the earth and the web of life it supports, where our choices are guided by stewardship, sustainability, and social justice."

This alignment was already enough of a reason to work with ICG, but when they decided to further their commitment to teaching kids how to grow and eat healthy food by building an outdoor kitchen we decided it was time to join forces as the ICG/GreenStar Partnership for Healthy Kids.

The partnership will allow the Ithaca Children's Garden to provision the new outdoor kitchen with pots, pans, and cooking supplies, plant the 50'x120' edible teaching and learning gardens, supply ICG's Organic Salad Farmers program with organic seed and growing medium, and stock the "pantry" for their garden chefs programs and camps with locally grown, high quality, GreenStar-purchased foodstuffs. The partnership will also make five need-based camp scholarships available.

Read more: GreenStar Partners with Ithaca Children’s Garden

 

Olympism and Cooperation

Sunday, 02 February 2014 16:04

By Joe Romano, 

Marketing Manager

The Olympics are a wonderful metaphor for world cooperation, the kind of international competition that's wholesome and healthy, an interplay between countries that represents the best in all of us.

— John Williams

Over twenty-seven centuries ago, in the year 776 BC on the high plains of Olympia in Peloponnesos, Greece, a naked cook streaked for a distance just short of two hundred meters to outrun the other naked Greek men running behind him. No, he had not just prepared a bad meal at a nudist colony. His name was Coroebus, a cook from the city of Elis, and he was the first Olympic champion. Moments later, he would be awarded a sacred olive-leaf laurel in a ceremony not unlike those of Olympiads we see today, a judge would place a palm branch in his hands, the spectators would cheer and throw flowers to him, and red ribbons would be tied on his head and hands as a mark of victory.

This month, the world will be watching the twenty-second modern Olympic Winter Games. They will be held in Sochi, Russia, amid concerns both political and social, as is common these days. As we go to press, seven more people suspected as terrorist threats were killed by Russian officials in a "pre-Olympic militant sweep." Concerns about Russia's intolerant laws and policies regarding homosexuality are casting a chill over participants and those traveling to watch the games. China aroused similar concerns in 2008 over their civil-rights policies, their treatment of Tibet, and their involvement in other nations' conflicts. Even in 2012 at the London games, there were controversies ranging from the large number of prominent junk-food sponsors to the wearing of the hijab by female Muslim participants, to the ongoing Falkland Island disputes.

Read more: Olympism and Cooperation

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: 
Creating a Socially Just Economy

Sunday, 02 February 2014 16:00

By Joe Romano, 

Marketing Manager

KirbyHasADreamOn Jan. 20, at Beverly J. Martin Elementary School, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Celebration Committee presented their annual luncheon, an event that recognizes the life and work of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This year's theme was "The Curse of Poverty Has No Justification." Kirby Edmonds, a Dorothy Cotton Institute senior fellow and program coordinator, presented the clear and inspiring keynote address, "How We Can Create a Socially Just Local Economy." Kirby cited specifics about poverty and the lack of opportunity in our community and offered simple ways we can all get involved.

Well-known for his work in the community, Kirby has collaborated for many years with staff, managers, and Council at GreenStar. The luncheon, which continues to be free and open to all, also featured performances by Trece, Cal Walker, and John Simon. GreenStar has always taken an active role in planning the event, as it coincides with our "A Day On, Not a Day Off" drive, which donates all of GreenStar's profits for the day to the planning committee.

This year's luncheon was organized by the Greater Ithaca Activities Center, Multicultural Resource Center, Center for Transformative Action, Cornell Public Service Center, SLECA and Cornell Dining, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tompkins County, GreenStar Cooperative Market, GreenStar Community Projects, Ithaca College Office of Student Engagement & Multicultural Affairs, and various community members.

 

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