wellness

Food for Thought, and Transformation

Monday, 01 July 2013 22:17

 

By Patrice Lockert Anthony

2013 Gail_AnthonyI love food. I am a foodie. My being a foodie is not the reason, though, that I am overweight. It is a common misperception that being overweight is directly related to how much food we eat. It is indirectly related. Everybody eats, yet everybody is not overweight. It is not about eating. It isn't even, necessarily, about what we eat. It is directly related to why we eat, how we eat, and where we eat. The food itself is ancillary.

I am not losing weight because I am eating less food. I am losing weight because I have shifted my focus. I am losing weight because I've decided some other things are weighted (pun intended) as being of more importance. I am losing weight because my body is not designed to give out at age fifty-three. Imagine living your life as a disciplined worker and achiever. You've gained all you sought. It's time to retire, but you can't enjoy the retirement you planned because your health is failing, or has failed. And it's your doing. Imagine living with that knowledge.

I believe in sweat equity. I put a lot of sweat equity into my company, my writing, and my teaching. Why should my body, my overall health, be of any less import? Many years ago, in a universe far, far away (Los Angeles), I worked for a bank. A couple of my colleagues had a very troubled relationship. One of the colleagues was quite heavy, and the other tall and lean. In yet another "set to" one day, the heavy colleague told the lean colleague to "go eat something" (I'm paraphrasing). With split-second timing, the lean one pivoted, looked the other dead in the eye, and said, "No, thank you, sweetheart. I'm built for speed, not for comfort." It was a stunning (and crushing) blow. At the time, I just thought it was a humiliatingly cruel thing to say.

Read more: Food for Thought, and Transformation

 

Postpartum Doulas Ease the Transition to Life with Baby

Friday, 31 May 2013 17:53

 

By Stephanie Haskins

woman-depressed-smWhile many people have become familiar with the role of a birth doula, they may not be aware of how a postpartum doula can assist in easing the transition to life with a new baby. Whether you're arriving home from the hospital or settling in after a home birth, you and your partner find yourselves alone with your baby. You may be tired from the birth. You may be recovering from a Cesarean or a particularly difficult delivery. You may have other children wanting your attention. However elated you are with this new little person in your lives, having a baby can be overwhelming.

In our culture of rugged individualism, we sometimes think we must shoulder our responsibilities on our own with little or no support from the outside. At no time is this expectation more glaring than during the postpartum period, when families begin the long process of birth recovery and learning how to care for a new infant on their own.

Statistics published by the Illinois Department of Public Health (http://www.idph.state.il.us/about/womenshealth/factsheets/pdpress.htm) in 2012 report that approximately 50 percent of new mothers experience mild depression; 10 to 20 percent experience postpartum depression, and 1 in 500 to 1000 suffer from postpartum psychosis. With new mothers left to fend for themselves, often spending hours alone with a new baby and possibly other children, little wonder that these numbers are so high. In other areas of the world, new mothers are cared for by their families and extended communities for 30 to 60 days postpartum. Typical in the United States is for a few meals to be delivered.

Read more: Postpartum Doulas Ease the Transition to Life with Baby

Homeopathy: A Conversation with Body, Mind, Soul

Sunday, 05 May 2013 17:59

 By Carrie Stearns

boironWhat if we believed our bodies to be full of wisdom? What if we really listened to our body when it expressed itself through pain and illness? What might we hear and where might it take us?

The practice of homeopathy involves deeply listening to the body and hearing its experience of pain and illness as a language guiding us toward greater balance and health. Homeopathy is a holistic system of medicine that works with the body to bring about healing. To work with the body, I, as a practitioner, need to really listen to the body and seek to understand what it's expressing. When a client comes with an acute or chronic health issue (like a sore throat or allergies), I do not just note it as a generic problem. I begin to ask a series of questions that help me to understand exactly how they experience their sore throat. I might, for example, ask if the pain is sharp or dull. Is it better or worse from swallowing? What happens when you drink warm liquids? These questions are key to finding the right remedy for treating the sore throat, because these modalities distinguish a client's symptoms and offer a clear expression of how the person actually experiences their sore throat. One thing that makes homeopathic medicine unique is that it relies on these details of how symptoms are actually experienced. This is the key to working with the body.

The conversation becomes even more interesting when we go beyond the specific physical modalities and begin to look at what the mind and emotions are saying. It might be revealed that this sore throat began after a difficult incident at work in which the client was unable to speak up for themselves. Or a person's debilitating sinus infections began a month after the sudden death of their father. When we really listen to the body, we can often begin to see a much bigger picture than a sore throat or clogged sinus cavity. We begin to get a view into our life as a whole and see where the roots of illness actually are. This is how symptoms become a doorway that can lead us into deeper relationship with ourselves. Such a doorway is full of potential to lead us toward living the life that we actually yearn for.

Read more: Homeopathy: A Conversation with Body, Mind, Soul

 

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New in Wellness

Local Toothpaste!

Anna Stratton,
Wellness Manager

dragonfly effect toothpasteDetox your mouth with a new locally made toothpaste, or try a new organic mouth rinse to leave your teeth sparkling clean.

If you're doing some spring cleaning this month, why not put your money where your mouth is? We've got a new locally made "detox" toothpaste from Dragonfly Effect out of Oneonta. How can a toothpaste be detoxifying, you ask? A blend of bentonite clay, diotamaceous earth, and other pure ingredients, this paste is meant to be swallowed, functioning as both tooth cleanser and internal cleanser. Vegan, gluten-free, and non-GMO, it's available in three fresh flavors. Also for squeaky-clean teeth, we're happy to introduce Essential Oxygen's Organic Brushing Rinse. It can be used as a mouthwash, of course, but it also doubles as a liquid toothpaste. Simply squirt it into your mouth, swish, brush, and spit! The makers recommend using it first thing in the morning to rid yourself of the bad bacteria that builds up in the mouth overnight. It's good not only for your teeth but for your entire immune system.

  • By Sigrid Kulkowitz

    Many of us have accepted for years that pollution of all sorts was a problem wreaking havoc on our internal and external environments. We have watched many things get worse. If you were like me, though I tried to be conscious, I also had blinders on to exactly how bad things had gotten. I preferred to maintain a certain comfort level, and to keep that feeling of being overwhelmed at bay.


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