Wild Spring Weather Slices Apple Harvest

By Tina Wright

12-7 BlackDiamond5Jackie Merwin, who has harvested fruit with her husband Ian on Black Diamond Farm in Trumansburg since the late 1990s, has never seen anything like the weather last spring. A heat wave in March (which one national weatherman called "like science fiction") put northern fruit trees in a blooming state of mind, right before a series of frosts that ended with a brutal hard freeze the last weekend of April. Local orchards were hard hit.

Merwin explains, "Since things were in bloom [when the freeze hit], we have no cherries, no peaches, no plums, no pears or apricots, we got completely frozen out of all those things ... people keep asking for a number on the apples and I'm thinking maybe 30 percent is what we'll have of our normal crop. I think I'm going to sell all of that at the Farmers Market."

Andy Rizos, GreenStar's Produce Manager, winces at this news. Black Diamond Farm has been a major supplier of apples for GreenStar. "This is going to affect us tremendously because they [Black Diamond] can get a lot more at the Farmers Market than they can here."

Fruit Growers News reports big losses in apple orchards in Michigan as well as New York State this season. Michigan may produce only 11 percent of last year's crop, and fuzzy guesstimates on New York production anticipate less than half of last year's apple volume.

Getting a good supply of local apples will be a challenge this year. GreenStar apple growers report a wide range of harvest forecasts. Organic apple growers at Hemlock Grove Farm in West Danby expect only 20 percent of last year's crop, while folks at Grisamore Farms in Locke are optimistic that they'll harvest around 75 percent of a typical apple crop..

Read more: Wild Spring Weather Slices Apple Harvest


You Say 'Tomato' ...

By Joe Romano, 

Marketing Manager


The metaphor of the melting pot is unfortunate and misleading. A more accurate analogy would be a salad bowl, for, though the salad is an entity, the lettuce can still be distinguished from the chicory, the tomatoes from the cabbage.

— Carl Neumann Degler

Food is social. It is shared by friends, family, and community. It represents one's culture and even has its own meaning. So what does it say when people don't share food, or when people disagree about how to eat? Or even when it polarizes people?

We are used to political disagreements; in fact, we can barely understand people of "that other" political party, whichever it may be. We seem to happily divide ourselves into nations and neighborhoods and draw up borders at cultural, racial, and class boundaries, too. We have to admit that somehow it comforts us to classify things — even people, sorting them like socks as alike and different. And somehow food is right there in the mix — think, for example, how many insults and slurs refer to what people eat.

Read more: You Say 'Tomato' ...

'Get Foodie' Debuts with Co-op Sponsorship

By Kristie Snyder,
GreenLeaf Editor

veg-318pxCarisa Fallon has wanted to do a cooking show since her daughter Rebecca, now nine, was a baby. “I’ve always loved to cook, and my mom did organic gardening so I had exposure to healthy choices,” she said.

Read more: 'Get Foodie' Debuts with Co-op Sponsorship


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New in Produce

Big Local Bounty

Andrew Hernandez,
Produce Manager

bigstock-Squash-smLocal produce is still rolling in. We've got greens and veggies of all kinds, and Black Diamond apples!

The receding of daylight, the descent of temperature, the cascading of leaves — the autumnal equinox is upon us as summer takes its final bow. Goodbye heat and humidity — it's time to break out the flannels like it's Seattle '91 and enjoy our local harvests while harvests we have. Stick and Stone Farm continues to provide unbeatable green beans, vibrant brassicas, delicious nightshades, and amazing Asian greens (baby bok choy, Chinese raab, and Chinese broccoli). Blue Heron Farm offers top-notch beets, cabbage, lettuce, and chard. Don't miss their fantastic garlic and tomatoes (can some salsa, you'll need a winter cupboard cache). Apple season is upon us as well. Black Diamond will provide us with 9+ different varieties of primo-quality apples and superbly delicious grapes. I mourn the passing of my summer sun, but remember how lucky we are to have the friendships of orchards and farms, farmers and farmhands, vegetables and fruits.

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